Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘zócalo’

Today the sun (finally) came out and hundreds (thousands?) of pots of cempasúchil (aka, cempoalxóchitl, cempaxochitl, cempoal, zempoal, flor de muertos) arrived in the city center.

IMG_1089

This was a photo op not only for yours truly but also the local press, as they trailed after the wife of Oaxaca’s governor while she viewed the unloading…

IMG_1078_land

and planting of the iconic Día de los Muertos flowers in the beds of the Zócalo and Alameda.

IMG_1076_crop2

The color and fragrance of the cempasúchil provide a lovely setting to sit and contemplate the world (and check your cell phone).

IMG_1077_port

Oaxaca is putting on her best to welcome her difuntos (deceased) along with the thousands of tourists who will soon be arriving.

Read Full Post »

As an extranjera (foreigner), I can do nothing more than observe…

P1020847

P1020856

report…

P1020860

IMG_6418

and feel.

P1020864

P1020858

Signs on the Alameda and zócalo this week.

Read Full Post »

My morning caller flew the coop and so did I.  After being confined to quarters for the past several days due to the rain and gloom, I walked downtown.

P1020289

Also, I was curious as to the state of the Zócalo, in light of the teachers, ambulantes, and the annual reenactment of “el Grito de Independencia” by the Governor, from the balcony of the Government Palace, at 11 PM tonight.

P1020307

I found, except for a handful of tents and tarps, the Alameda and Zócalo were back to normal.

P1020309

Castillos were being constructed on either side of the Government Palace.

P1020301

P1020304

P1020297

And, like every year, the Mexican flag was flying high, green, white, and red lights and banners were strung, and images of the heroes of the Mexican War of Independence from Spain decorated the front of the Palacio de Gobierno

P1020291

P1020292

Most of the teachers and ambulantes have departed and all is being readied for el Grito de Independencia 2014.  And, nobody seems to miss the State Police, who are staging a “work stoppage.”   Ahhh, Oaxaca…  Ya gotta love her!

El Grito de Independencia
¡Mexicanos!
¡Vivan los héroes que nos dieron la patria y libertad!
¡Viva Hidalgo!
¡Viva Morelos!
¡Viva Josefa Ortíz de Dominguez!
¡Viva Allende!
¡Viva Galeana y los Bravo!
¡Viva Aldama y Matamoros!
¡Viva la Independencia Nacional!
¡Viva México! ¡Viva México! ¡Viva México!

In English
Mexicans!
Long live the heroes that gave us the Fatherland (and liberty)!
Long live Hidalgo!
Long live Morelos!
Long live Josefa Ortiz de Dominguez!
Long live Allende!
Long live Galeana and the Bravos!
Long live Aldama and Matamoros!
Long live National Independence!
Long Live Mexico! Long Live Mexico! Long Live Mexico!

Read Full Post »

I walked down to the zócalo today.  Not exactly big news, I know, but the truth is, I’ve been avoiding it.  However, I was out of dried cranberries and pecans and had to go to the Mercado Benito Juárez to restock the larder.

New posters have gone up on building walls, this one calling for justice for the victims of the previous governor (Ulises Ruiz Ortiz) and preparations for a general political strike against the structural reforms (education and the state-owned oil industry, of which I’ve previously written) recently passed by the federal government.

Posters on wall

The zócalo and surrounding streets continue to be filled with teachers, tents, and al fresco kitchens.  No surprise, this is causing a traffic nightmare and parking is at even more of a premium than usual.  However, if you are in need of a pit stop for you or your car, this one is on Trujano at 20 de noviembre.

P1010841

The restaurants under the portales on the zócalo have been especially impacted — some had patrons sipping their morning coffee and hot chocolate while looking out over the sea of tents, tarps, and banners and some were empty.

Restaurant tables and chairs and teachers union banner

If you are tired of reading the newspaper accounts, D-II-218 of the Telesecundarias (rural distance education programs) from Miahuatlán has provided a poster so you can read up on the issues in dispute from the teachers’ point of view.

Banner with news clippings, photos, and informational notes

However, if you are tired of it all, you can always stop by the local newsstand to catch up on what’s really important — the opening of Home Depot (an OMG! OMG! OMG! event for some) or, if you are so inclined, graphic images of crime and violence.  By the way, regarding the latter, I stumbled on a website that gives A Vague History of La Nota Roja.

Newspapers clipped to a sandwich board

What can I say?  Good news is in short supply, no matter where one looks.  The handwriting seems to be on the wall here, there, and everywhere…

Read Full Post »

“It’s a beautiful day in the neighborhood.”

A winter Sunday in Oaxaca.

Read Full Post »

Today, the truck arrived, the wheelbarrows were loaded, and the gardening crew began filling the flower beds of Oaxaca’s zócalo…

Truck filled with poinsettias

Workers with wheelbarrows filled with poinsettias

Worker digging up flower bed, with poinsettias in pots in background

Mass of red and one white poinsettias in flower bed.

Navidad is coming to Oaxaca!

Read Full Post »

Instead of the coming of age novel, A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, we have the real life drama of a tree falls in Oaxaca.  Heading down to the mercado this morning, I was brought up short by this heartbreaking sight.

Large trunk of tree uprooted from ground.

According to reports, there were many present to hear and see one of the grand 130+ year old Indian laurels topple during a storm on Saturday night.  And, worst of all, ten people were injured, two seriously.  Trees in the city, including Indian laurels in the Zócalo, have been plagued by adversity.  A laurel in the Zócalo fell a few years ago, damaging a nearby building, and most recently in May 2011, I wrote about a laurel on the Alameda that toppled.  Resurrection was attempted and guy-wires remain to this day holding it upright.  I guess the experts decided this latest one was beyond rescue.

Large tree cut into pieces

Controversy reigns, as many assert that these trees should be able to withstand the rain and less-than gale force winds.  Thus speculation over the cause runs rampant.  Root rot appears to be the immediate culprit but the big question is, why?

Pile of massive wood logs

And, as Chris sadly noted a couple of months ago, regarding the diseased flamboyant trees in front of Santo Domingo de Guzmán, Any tree is hard to replace.

Read Full Post »

And the juxtapositions continue; the annual nativity scene set up on the zócalo in Oaxaca across from the Government Palace and the ongoing occupation by the women of San Juan Copala, not to mention the ubiquitous banners of  Section 22 of the Teachers’ Union.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Then there were the impossibly cute kids and a rapid request from them.  “Mas despacio, por favor,” sez I.  A slow motion reply followed, “To-ma nu-es-tra fo-to,” sez the older girl.  And, so I did!

Read Full Post »

…warms the night and the heart.

After a week (plus) of temps that dropped into the high 30s/low 40s during the night (Brrrr… central heating, what’s that?), sun, clear blue sky, and mild evening temperatures have returned.  It’s perfect weather for strolling around la ciudad, wandering in and out of artesania shops, doing a little stress-free Christmas shopping, and pausing every once in a while to absorb the scene.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

You might have noticed, the angel from Friday’s post successfully ascended the ladder and now graces the top of the stable.  And, along with bells and Rudolph, a Star of David hangs on the side of a building.  Interesting… this is the first time I’ve seen it as part of holiday decorations.  By the way, there are no synagogues in Oaxaca.

Read Full Post »

Oaxaca is gearing up for Christmas.  Thankfully, it is not (yet) as hectic and commercial as in el norte.  Though decorations have been been displayed, front and center, in my local Soriana super-mercado for at least a month, it is only in the last few days that the city’s electricians have been positioning lights on the trees around the zócalo…

Electrician positioning light on tree

to  illuminate the welcoming niño.

Mannequin of boy in sombrero and sarape

Lambs have begun appearing…

Long white-haired mannequin carrying lamb.

Angels are being elevated…

Workman about to carry an angel mannequin up a ladder.

Clothing is laundered in preparation for Navidad…

Female mannequin washing clothes as mannequins of lambs watch.

And, thousands of poinsettias have been brought in to add splashes of color to the beds beneath the 130+ year old Indian laurels.

Flower bed of poinsettias under Indian laurel tree.

It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas!

Read Full Post »

Hammock time

Guelaguetza is almost here, the Zócalo is teeming with tourists, and a massive stage is being set up opposite the cathedral.  I think these guys are guarding it.  I want their job!


Two guys in hammocks hanging from stage scaffolding

Hmmm… there’s an empty hammock.  Maybe I should apply!

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: