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Posts Tagged ‘San Mateo Macuilxóchitl’

Muchisimas gracias to all my wonderful blog readers — for reading, for commenting, for sharing, for the opportunity to meet some of you, and for inspiring me to continue.  A look back at Oaxaca scenes that never made it into the blog…

January – Although spring was a couple of months away, the Primavera (Tabebuia chrysotricha) was already in bloom.

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February – Cattle car on the carretera outside Tlacolula de Matamoros on Sunday market day.

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March – A quiet morning on Monte Albán.

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April – Decorating with agave flowers on Easter Sunday in Mitla.

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May – Police temporarily remove and replace Sección 22 on the zócalo.

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June – Though we arrived hours early for a festival in San Juan Guelavía, the sacred and profane were already present.

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July – A favorite view from my terrace, the African tulip trees in full bloom.

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August – At Casa Colonial the water lilies and hyacinths were stunning.

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September – Cochineal (the “perfect red” dye) exhibition at Museo de Arte Contemporaneo de Oaxaca (MACO).

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October – Returning from Teotitlán de Valle one morning, a globo was landing near San Mateo Macuilxochitl.

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November – On the way to Mercado Hidalgo in Colonia Reforma to buy Thanksgiving groceries, Our Lady of the Wires (?).

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December – Rooftop still life in El Centro.

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A long, strange, and fascinating trip it continues to be.  As another song says, Próspero año y felicidad!

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It didn’t start that way; I awoke to horrifying news from Colorado.  Thank goodness blogger buddy Chris called and the heart that beats in Oaxaca beckoned.

First stop was the “Al Son del Valle,” an exhibition of canastas from 17  villages in the central valleys of Oaxaca.  These are baskets that are carried on the heads of women during calendas (parades); you may remember them from previous posts on the convites in Teotitlán del Valle.  The art of crafting canastas and the traditions and culture they represent have been proudly and lovingly passed down through the generations.

San Antonino Castillo Velasco canasta decorated with Flor Inmortal, the flower that never dies.

Canasta from San Mateo Macuilxóchitl

From San Jerónimo Tlacochahuaya, these canastas are lit and become pinwheels of fireworks at the end of a calenda.

Canasta of Las Chinas Oaxaqueñas of the city of Oaxaca

Canasta from Tlacolula de Matamoros.

Canasta from Zimatlán de Álvarez made of crepe paper.

Muchas gracias, Oaxaca, I needed that!

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