Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘muerteada’

Looking back, in black and white…

IMG_1600_b&w

IMG_1448_b&w

IMG_1468_b&w

IMG_1472_b&w

IMG_1501_b&w

IMG_1473_b&w

Magna Comparsa Oaxaca through the streets of the city on October 28, 2017.

Read Full Post »

Last night, throughout the streets of the city, the living began welcoming the dead.

IMG_1491

IMG_1467

IMG_1446

Like the Guelaguetza desfile of delegations, Oaxaqueños and tourists (foreign and domestic) crowded the sidewalks along the Magna Comparsa Oaxaca 2017 route — from the Cruz de Piedra, down García Vigil, left on Allende, right on Macedonio Alcalá, right on Independencia, and into the Alameda.

IMG_1453

IMG_1531

IMG_1454

With bands leading the way, catrinas in regional dress and dancers in traditional muerteada attire whirled and twirled, high-stepped and jumped, and moved and grooved their way through the streets.

IMG_1514

IMG_1449

IMG_1508

With earthquakes and hurricanes and now the resumption of the zócalo plantón (occupation) and bloqueos (blocades) of roads into and out of the city by Sección XXII of the teachers’ union and their allies, Oaxaca and Oaxaqueños needed to party-down in joyous abandon — and they did!

IMG_1499

IMG_1561

IMG_1615

Día de Muertos observances are different in the indigenous villages — the mood is more formal and each village has customs and rituals that tradition dictates must be followed.  But the bottom line in ciudad and pueblo is to provide a welcome worthy of both the living and the dead.  The celebrations have only just begun…

Read Full Post »

Celebrations in Oaxaca surrounding Día de Muertos are beginning.  This past week, we, members of the Mexico Travel Photography Facebook group, were issued a 5-day “Day of the Dead” photo challenge by moderator, Norma Schafer.  There are always so many favorite images from so many events that I never get around to posting, so this was my opportunity.  My five…

img_0085

Panteón, Santa María Atzompa, Oaxaca on Oct. 31, 2015

img_0125

Offering on tomb in Panteón Municipal de Tlacolula de Matamoros, Oaxaca on Nov. 1, 2015

p1030655

Muerteada, morning after the night before, Nov. 2, 2014, San Agustín Etla, Oaxaca

img_6545

Sun sets on Santa María Atzompa panteón, Oct. 31, 2014

p1030223_bw

On the Alcalá in Oaxaca City, Oct. 31, 2014

And, five more, just because…

img_0079

Santa María Atzompa, Oct. 31, 2015

p1030402

San Pablo Villa de Mitla, ofrenda with pan de muertos, Nov. 1, 2014

p1030148

Chocolate calaveras at Villa de Etla, Oct. 31, 2014

p1030157

Cempasuchil (marigold) vendor at Villa de Etla, Oct. 31, 2014

p1150252

Casa de las Artesanías de Oaxaca, Oct. 31, 2015

That’s all folks, for now.  Stay tuned for more to come from this year.

Read Full Post »

If it’s November 2nd, it must be morning muerteada madness in San Agustín Etla .  A few faces in the crowd from the Barrio San José contingent…

IMG_6663

These guys had been dancing through the streets all night.  Cervesa seemed to be the beverage of choice this morning, though, bottles of clear liquid was also being passed around — and I’m sure it wasn’t  water!

P1030771

Had to snap this guy — not only was his makeup gory and great, he topped it off with a San Francisco 49er cap.

P1030731 copy

And, then there was this boy…  As with all the traditions here, children observe, learn, and participate at a very young age.

 

Read Full Post »

It’s been a magnificent Muertos filled with memorable moments and special people, along with a feast for ALL the senses.  An initial pass through the photos has weeded them down to 450.  Yikes!  Lots more weeding and processing to do.  In the meantime, here is a snapshot from the past 5 days.

And the magic continues today, when we return to San Antonino Castillo Velasco.

Read Full Post »

Cempasuchitl, catrinas, and comparsas.  El día de los muertos is coming…

Mural at the corner of Aldama and Hidalgo in Barrio de Jalatlaco.

Read Full Post »

You might well ask, “What is a muerteada?”  It is a comparsa (parade) that is part of traditional Día de los Muertos celebrations particular to the state of Oaxaca.  According to the book, Day of the Dead: When Two Worlds Meet in Oaxaca, the muerteada allows the dead “to ‘occupy’ a living body, either a muerteada participant or an audience member, for a time, and therefore enjoy the entertainment directly rather than vicariously.”

Like Commedia dell’Arte, there are stock characters — in this case, the happy widow, the dying or dead husband, the father of the widow, a doctor, a priest, a shaman, people dressed like death, devils, and las lloronas (weeping women).  However, unlike Commedia dell’Arte, in the muerteada men play all the roles.

Last year we joined the Vista Hermosa, Etla murteado.  However, this year blogger buddy Chris decided I was ready for the big time — the “battle of the bands” when the muerteadas of San Agustín Etla and Barrio San José meet — Banda Tromba Sinaloense for San Agustín and MonteVerde Banda for San José.  FYI:  This is after participants and their bands have danced their way up and down the hills of their respective neighborhoods all night long, stopping at designated houses for food and drink — mezcal and cervesas seemed to be the beverage of choice, especially among the men!

So, early on the Nov. 2, we went in search of the San Agustín contingent, we found them, joined in the merriment, were offered food and drink along the way, and eventually came to the crossroad where mania turned to mayhem, albeit organized mayhem — courtesy of the white-shirted security for San Agustín and red-shirted security for San José.  They kept the dancers and supporters from each side apart, leaving the face-off to the two bands.  It was wild!!!  After 20+ minutes of battling bands, it was over and we and the San Agustín contingent trudged back up the hill.

You may have spotted a tall silver-haired gringo right in the middle of the action in one or two of the photos, that would be Chris.  Be sure to check out the video he put together of all the madness.

According to Organizing Committee President, Alfredo Erick Pérez, the muerteada in San Agustín Etla dates back to the 1800s, possibly to the days of Mexican President Porfirio Díaz.

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: