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Posts Tagged ‘tianguis’

Today found me (courtesy of blogger buddy Chris) savoring market day in Tlacolula de Matamoros.  The Sunday market is one of the oldest continuous tianguis in Mesoamerica, a commercial center for the neighboring communities, and a beehive of energy and activity.

There is food…

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Chiles and more

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Chickens roasting on an open fire

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A bounty of fruit

Necessary cooking equipment, Oaxaca style…

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Gourds for measuring and serving, palm fans for fanning the cooking flames, and brushes for moving ingredients about the comal

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Metate for grinding corn, chocolate, dyes, etc.

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Molcajetes necessary for crushing and grinding herbs, spices, and making the best salsas and guacamole

And, most of all, people…

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Poultry shopper and hammock seller

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Tortilla vendors

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Garlic vendor

Market day in Tlacolula is chicken soup for my soul.

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After three weeks in el norte, all my bags are packed and I’m ready to return to Oaxaca.  While malls and supermarkets abound here in the San Francisco Bay Area, shopping doesn’t hold a candle to experiencing the Sunday market in Tlacolula de Matamoros.

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Sidewalk murals greet shoppers on their way to the mercado.

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Wearing traditional skirts, blouses, rebozos, and aprons, vendors compete for customers.

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Stopping inside the mercado for barbacoa de chivo is a delicious way to take a break.

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The apron selection, like everything else, is mind boggling!

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Lastly, another sidewalk mural to send shoppers on their way home.

There is nothing like the life and color of shopping in Oaxaca.  ¡Hasta pronto!

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Sunday is market day in Tlacolula de Matamoros and I was so ready to escape the city.  No bloqueos blocked our way and Sunday traffic was even lighter than usual, thus the drive was uneventful.  In addition, though rumors of gasoline shortages have been rampant, we had no trouble filling up at one of the numerous Pemex stations along our eastbound route.  Once we arrived, we found the market was a beehive of activity, aisles had us crowded shoulder to shoulder with shoppers from Tlacolula and the surrounding villages.

The color… the energy… the bounty… the people… the smells… the street food…the life.  It was all just what the doctor ordered!  And, when I got home and turned on my computer, a documentary on market day in Tlacolula popped up on my Facebook news feed.  (h/t Zeferino Mendoza)

It may be from 2012, but not much has changed.  This Sunday open air market (tianguis) is one of the oldest continuously operating in Mesoamerica.

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Every time I pass by the turnoff to Tlacolula de Matamoros, I break into song, “Be-bop-a-lula, she’s my baby.”  And, seeing this guy on the front of a building on one of the town’s main streets only contributes to channeling Gene Vincent.

Wall art of tuba player

I was last there early this month for the first Festival de la Nieve, Mezcal y Vinagre.  Ice cream, mezcal, and fruit and veggies in vinegar… what’s not to like?

Bottles of mezcal

And then there is the weekly Sunday tianguis (market), where women in colorfully embroidered cotton aprons over tightly pleated polyester brocade skirts (where did that style come from?) buy and sell everything under the sun.

3 women in embroidered aprons.

As the article, The Pop-up Food Shops of Oaxaca confirms, I’m not the only one who is captivated by Tlacolula.

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