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Posts Tagged ‘National Museum of Anthropology’

Last week, while in Mexico City, I paid my respects to Tláloc, the Aztec rain deity, both at the Templo Mayor and Museo Nacional de Antropología (National Anthropology Museum).

Templo Mayor, Mexico City

Tláloc — Templo Mayor, Mexico City

I’m now back in Oaxaca and, for the third day in a row, Tláloc is making his presence known.  And, rain is in the forecast for the next several days.

Fragments of a Tláloc brazier - Museo Nacional de Antropología, Mexico City

Fragments of a Tláloc brazier — Museo Nacional de Antropología, Mexico City

Thunder is rumbling and, out of the corner of my eye, I see flashes of lightning to the east.  It may be the “dry season,” but Tláloc is speaking and we are listening.

Pot with image of Tláloc -- Museo Nacional de Antropología, Mexico City

Pot with image of Tláloc — Museo Nacional de Antropología, Mexico City

Perhaps drought-stricken California might want to build a temple to this supreme god of the rains — not to mention, institute mandatory water rationing!

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Currently at the Museo Nacional de Antropología

Spanish conquest still “open wound in Mexico,” curator says

Banner for La Conquista a sangre y fuego

Mexico City, Mexico (NTN24 Wires) – The Spanish conquest continues to be “an open wound in Mexico” five centuries later, the curator of the National Museum of Anthropology’s “La Conquista a sangre y fuego” (The Conquest by Fire and Blood) exhibition, Francisco Gonzalez-Hermosillo, said.

“There have been all kinds of reactions, but, especially, there are many who leave very hurt after seeing the bloody images that speak of the violence there was during that period in history,” the researcher told Efe.

The paintings, codices and arms that make up the exhibition show the cruel methods used by the Spanish to impose their rule on Mesoamerica, Gonzalez-Hermosillo said.

The exhibition was organized to mark the 490th anniversary of the conquest of the Aztec city of Tenochtitlan, where Mexico City is situated, by Spanish conquistador Hernan Cortes.

The goal of the exhibition is not to “change perceptions of history” but to give the Indians’ view of the conquest because it is “so seldom taken into account,” Gonzalez-Hermosillo said.  [Read full article]

Fifty-three percent of Mexico’s indigenous population lives in Oaxaca (Sipaz report).  One can only hope Oaxaca is on the itinerary for this traveling exhibit.

 

 

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