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Posts Tagged ‘bike riders’

In the 5+ years that I have been living here, Oaxaca has become much more bike friendly.  It’s a good thing too, because traffic, even without the bloqueos (blockades), has gotten much worse.  I mentioned last Sunday we had to detour due to a bike race and passed these spandex warriors, out for a Sunday ride.

2 guys in spandex on country road

In the city, the narrow streets, often with double-parked vehicles, weren’t designed for a growing middle class and their desire for cars.  However, poco a poco (little by little), accommodations are being made to achieve a modicum of safety and peaceful co-existence between cars and bikes.  Bike racks began appearing in early summer.

Bike racks

And, much to my amazement, a couple of weeks ago, I saw actual bike lanes.  Wonders will never cease!!!

Bike lane:  "BICI" spelled out with line drawing of a bike

However, I’m not exactly sure what someone is trying to say, here.  (Update:  thanks to some helpful blog readers, I have sadly been informed, “a white bike is put where someone has been killed on a bike.  They are called “ghost bikes”.

Bike near top of street light

Bike on, mis amigas y amigos… even in the rain… Mother Nature will thank you!

Bike riders on wet cobblestone street

If you are in Oaxaca and like to ride, you might want to check out “Oaxaca es más bella en bicicleta” (Oaxaca is More Beautiful on a Bicycle) on Wednesdays and Fridays from 9 PM to 10:30 PM.  They meet in front of Santo Domingo church.  There is also a Sunday ride from the city to Santa María del Tule.

Update:  Larry G. reminded me that OaxacaMTB.org is a great resource for those interested in mountain biking in Oaxaca.

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Sometimes a Sunday drive is just what the doctor ordered.  Though when in Oaxaca, one can’t assume the course will run smooth.

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After being blocked by bloqueos a couple of times last week, blogger buddy Chris and I were in the midst of congratulating ourselves when our leisurely drive south on Hwy. 190 came to a halt as we attempted to turn west at San Dionisio Ocotepec.  At least ten men and a few trucks were positioned across the turnoff.  Oh, no, not again… another protest?

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No, a bike race had closed the road.  Seeing our disappointment, we were directed to make a U-turn, backtrack a mile (or so), and turn onto the dirt road that skirted the hillside, in order to bypass the race.  It was easier said than done, but after a few fits and starts, gullies and rocky outcroppings, and inquiries of all manner of vehicles coming from the opposite direction, we eventually wound up back on the paved road — right where we wanted to be!

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We weren’t the only ones westward bound.  These guys, while not part of the race, were also enjoying a Sunday ride.  We passed them on our way to San Baltazar Chichicapam.

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And, why were we going to Chichicapam?  To fill up our 5 liter “gas” canisters with some of our favorite mezcal made from locally grown agave, of course!  Muy suave…

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Sunday or not, a campesino’s work is never done.  Cattle, burros, and herds of goats were a common sight as we continued our Sunday drive.  And, speaking of goats…  By the time we turned north at Ocotlán de Morelos, we were starving.  Lucky for us, Los Huamuches, our “go to” roadside restaurant between Santo Tomás Jalieza and San Martín Tilcajete, wasn’t far away.

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What can I say?  Mild temperatures, spectacular scenery, good company, and barbacoa muy sabrosa — the “doctor” was right!

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